Kaltura Meetup on Nov 10th, 2009 :: 0:56:01 to 0:58:18
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0:51:00 to 1:11:17( Edit History Discussion )
Title: Group discussion

A give–and–take discussion about technology relating to open video.

0:53:58 to 0:56:01( Edit History Discussion )

Ben Moskowitz: So that's what we work on, and we mostly do community building and events and stuff like that. We'll obviously have another Open Video Conference, which will be really interesting. If you're in New York, it'll be next year, next summer. It's a little ways off, but you should make plans to come because it's really fun. (It's like a festival, it's less of a conference and more a festival.) We're also doing things to spread this idea of open video, and make it a topic of conversation on people's radar, people who aren't necessarily techies or necessarily in the video community. One of the things we're doing, starting this Monday, is launching a contest. We're asking people to make 60-second videos explaining what open video is and why it's important, and the winner will get to go to SWSX Interactive, a full–expenses–paid trip, and some runners-up will get cameras and interesting stuff like that. <Shay David: Are family members eligible?> Employees of Kaltura, Yale, PCF, and Mozilla are unfortunately ineligible as are their family members, but friends aren't ineligible, so if you want to put 60-sec video in you can be really creative. It can just be a web-cam video, it can be an animation, you can do whatever you want. We have some really cool judges too: Jimmy Wales is one of the judges, Mitchell Baker from Mozilla [Foundation] is going to be another judge, it could be a really good opportunity to get your message out there. Tell your friends too! We want to spread this idea of open video. We're also going to be doing meet-ups in select cities—it's still a little hazy, but what we want to do is to get people who are big lighthouses in the community, people who have a lot to say and are respected. People like Jesse Dylan (who's the son of Bob Dylan), who's really outspoken advocate for stuff like net neutrality just for democratizing video. [In] Boston, we're working with Lawrence Lessig. If you're into the social–political dimensions of what it means when more people get their hands on video, go to our website at openvideoalliance.org, follow us, and if you're interested you'll find a lot of stuff really worthwhile.

0:56:01 to 0:58:18( Edit History Discussion )

Ben Moskowitz: So really quickly, I want to make some examples of what I mean by open video, to fill–it–in a little bit. So George, I think what you're doing is like a perfect example of what the future of video should look like. You've talked a little bit about what OpenMeetings.org does, but do you want to give the pitch again, like "how's does it work?" and "what makes it unique?"

George Chriss: Sure, let me come up front.
Leah Belsky: Are you going to take yourself off-camera?
GC: I never do…

So, um, yeah. Two–three years ago I wouldn't have been able to tell you that my future has a lot to do with video; at the time, [I was] just working with open technologies, [focusing on] community ethics that were touched on here. That said, video is poised for explosive growth in the future, and it does matter how that works both on technical, legal, and social levels. The Open Video Conference I think was very high–impact in terms of starting conversations that are needed to make this actually happen. At the time, one week prior to that conference I actually started the OpenMeetings.org website on the basis that, working on a volunteer basis, I had recorded a whole bunch of meetings for extending conversations that are in those meetings to other communities. (Actually the same community too, because at Penn State it's very unique in the sense that you have an organizational turnover every 4-5 years – 25% of the brightest and most experienced people leave the organization, so it's very punishing for any sort of organizational memory.) That's how at least I got started, and from there I try to do this as quickly as I can, both helping facilitate or contribute in some way to the technical levels, making it really easy to work with open formats and actually get people to use it. You can shoot all the video footage in the world, but unless you actually make it compelling it doesn't really count. That is at least one of the challenges.

0:58:18 to 1:00:16( Edit History Discussion )

The other challenge is, "how do you get these communities that haven't talked to each other yet, because everyone's so new, talking to each other?" In that sense it's been very exciting to just show up to conferences across a whole broad range of topics of societal interest and to start this, and to start it in-earnest. The Open Video Conference was the first conference I showed up to (I had one camera there)—unfortunately, there's still a video backlog, so if you are interested in volunteering some of your time I'd be happy to give you lots of video to edit—the 2009 NYC Wiki Conference (Wikipedia/Wikimania, the people that lead those communities, that was here in New York City), then also other conferences, one from a new, non-profit organization called the Open Forum Foundation, they had a whole conference about Congress and it's geared towards essentially re-engineering the basic constituent–representative relationship and deploying web 2.0 technologies into the actual legislative process, to make government work better than it does now (across a whole range of different offices and organizations).

Ben Moskowitz: So OpenMeetings.org uses the MetaVidWiki code base, right?

George Chriss: Yes; one more conference then I'll wrap that up. Then also PublicMediaCamp down in DC, and that's geared towards discussing how non-profit, PBS–style radio stations and media stations will actually interact with this, because they will be one of the first ones active in this space. They have their own challenges, financially or otherwise. There's a lot of interest there.

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